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The Orkney Isles

 

Life in the Orkney Islands, like any small group of islands, is dominated by the sea. In the past it was an all present force that shaped your life, or took it if it was angry. That mostly depended on the time of year, as the sea is ruled by spirits; in summer the Mother of the Sea gives life to all marine creatures and calms the waves but in winter it is ruled by Teran, a male spirit who causes the storms that wreck ships.

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0 Comments | Posted in Blogs By Tom Muir and The History Press

David Hutchings talks about the wider impact of the RMS Titanic tragedy.

David Hutchings talks about the RMS Titanic's effect on the British Empire - its pride, prestige and self-confidence.

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0 Comments | Posted in Blogs By David Hutchings and The History Press

The Friday Digest 11/04/14

11 Apr 2014 11:15:00


secateurs-2.jpg


The Friday Digest showcases the best of this week's history and publishing news. 

This week's update features debates on the future of the publishing industry, an exorcism in Elizabethan London and the curious history of the items in your tool shed.

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0 Comments | Posted in Blogs By The History Press

G. J. Cooper on the RMS Titanic's Captain Smith

RMS Titanic specialist G. J. Cooper talks about the Captain's movements on the fateful morning of the ship's maiden voyage...

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0 Comments | Posted in Blogs By G. J. Cooper and The History Press

Isambard Kingdom Brunel

 

The author of PocketGIANTS: Brunel, Eugene Byrne, talks about the engineering pioneer's influence on history...

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0 Comments | Posted in Blogs By Eugene Byrne and The History Press

File:King Henry V from NPG.jpg


On this day, 9 April, 599 years ago, Henry V was crowned king of England. It snowed heavily in London that day. Writing a few years later, but before the king died in 1422, Thomas Walsingham, the resident chronicler at St Albans Abbey, recalled two interpretations of this unseasonable weather. Some thought it portended that the king would be cold hearted and rule his subjects harshly; others took it as an omen that vice would be frozen and new virtues would flourish in the coming spring. Both were correct.  

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0 Comments | Posted in Blogs By A.J. Pollard and The History Press

A map of the subordinate plans of Operation Bodyguard, the 1944 deception in support of the Allied invasion of Normandy (D-Day). Image from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operation_Fortitude


Lieutenant-Colonel Roger Hesketh was a member of General Eisenhower’s deception unit, Ops B, and was a key figure in Operation Fortitude, the great Allied deception carried out against the Germans to support the Normandy campaign. After the war, Hesketh wrote a book on Fortitude, and in it he asked the question: of all the elements employed to deceive the enemy, from the fake runways and aircraft, to the dummy airborne troops, and the double agents feeding disinformation, which one had the greatest effect? Which part of Fortitude had actually fooled the Germans?

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0 Comments | Posted in Blogs By Jason Webster for The History Press

The Friday Digest 04/04/14

4 Apr 2014 12:00:00


The Friday Digest showcases the best of this week's history and publishing news. 

Skeleton from a victim of the Black Death (Source: http://bbc.in/O86dHX)

This week's update features the skeletons of victims of the Black Death, a First World War project that really builds up a picture of individuals serving during the war, and the best thrillers and crime writting by women. 

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0 Comments | Posted in Blogs By The History Press

The visible remnants of our social and business history are all around us – in the form of faded signs and adverts – sometimes known as ghostsigns. These are particularly prevalent in towns and cities with industrial pasts, including mining towns, factory-orientated areas and dockside communities such as Gloucester. 

The Imperial Inn - This elaborately decorated Grade II listed inn is a wonderful example of Victorian architecture

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0 Comments | Posted in Blogs By Chris West and The History Press

 New information suggests Henry VIII only had five wives...

Swedish historian Dr Eurt Ton has found new evidence to suggest Henry VIII only had five wives - debunking a popular idea about the infamous king.

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0 Comments | Posted in Blogs By Paul Sullivan and The History Press

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